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    • 30
    • Nov

    IoT meets Industry – Part 2

    IoT meets Industry (Part 2)

    The potential of IoT in manufacturing is clear. Unplanned downtime and reactive maintenance are undesirable cost drivers. I read that in car manufacturing, every hour of downtime can equate to $2m in losses. Fortune calculated that IoT could deliver maintenance savings of 25%, reduce unplanned downtime by 50% and extend the life of machinery by years. Sounds good?

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    • 18
    • Nov

    IoT meets Industry – Part 1

    IoT meets Industry (Part 1)

    No doubt you’ve heard of the IoT – it’s seems hard to miss these days. Now we also have Industrial IoT - in vogue for describing its applicability to the broader industrial sector.

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    • 12
    • Nov

    Part 3 - Internet of Things Sensors for Smart Farming - Connectivity

    Hello again

    Part 3 of the IoT in Agriculture series! This week I’ll be covering how we managed to get well over a million points of agriculture data from 9 sites all over the UK to our servers over the sunny 2015 summer.

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    • 30
    • Oct

    Not Horizontal, Cross Vertical!

    Category: Internet of Things

    The Internet of Things as a concept is interesting, fun and exciting, but there needs to be a shift from talking about it in terms of the latest connected device, which really is no more than something that uses the internet to talk to a dedicated app in most cases. This is not really IoT as the boundaries are fixed and there is little that can be done to enhance the user experience via the possibilities of interconnectivity.

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    • 30
    • Sep

    Internet of Things sensors for Smart Farming - Part 2

    The wait is over!

    Yes, the huge and delayed sequel event of the year of a much beloved series that everyone is talking about.. Of course it's the follow-on to the first part of the Internet of Things sensors for Smart Farming series!

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    • 27
    • Aug

    Waste of Analytic Minds

    Category: Internet of Things

    Over the last decade we have seen an exponential growth in data generation, enabled by the internet and all the new services that have grown and matured with it.

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    • 23
    • Jul

    Internet of Things meets Farming

    Are you serious?

    If someone told me 12 months ago that we’d be talking to farmers and walking through winter wheat fields I’d have told them they were crazy. The only thing farmers hate more than technology is talking to people trying to sell them technology, right?

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    • 24
    • Jun

    Internet of Things sensors for Smart Farming - Part 1

    Updated - Part 2 here

    Promises, promises

    This post concentrates on farming, or smart agriculture to be precise, but I don’t think I’m going out on a limb to suggest that these thoughts will no doubt repeat themselves in other industries (in-fact I’m struggling to think of any exceptions and am open to suggestions!). There is so much feverish discussion on how the Internet of Things will change everything (from clever refrigerators to sensored-up pigs); having as much or more impact as when we started to adopt the Internet into our day-to-day lives. It’s easy to get caught up in the excitement and hype (after all, the IoT is currently at the top of the Gartner's hype cycle) while not considering where we actually are and where we need to get to.

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    • 21
    • May

    Time of the V1.0s

    Pilots regularly joke, ‘Never fly the A model of anything.’ (World War II Pilot Officer Edward Thompson of 433 (RCAF) Squadron). Like software and hardware products, aircraft have general maturity designations; A or Mark 1 for the first production model, B (or Mark 2) for a refined and typically upgraded model and so on, (if you're in an 'X' or it doesn't have a letter after it you know you're in for a wild ride with what is essentially an experimental beta aircraft). The joke has real implications - the 1968 McDonnell Douglas DC-10-10 was a successor to an established product and introduced many advanced features, yet its early years were plagued with incidents that over the lifetime of the aircraft resulted in over a thousand fatalities. However as time progressed so did the product, to the point where it became seen as a dependable workhorse, still in use today.

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